Department of
Biological Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

Virology / viral pathogenesis

Don Coen

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-1691
Fax: 
617-432- 3833
Address: 
Room SGM - 304
Address: 
250 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston MA 02115

Our laboratory takes molecular approaches to herpesvirus replication and latency.  These studies provide excellent models for biological processes in eukaryotic cells and, because herpesviruses such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are important pathogens, to exploit differences between herpesvirus and cellular processes for safe and effective antiviral therapy.   Areas of research include:

Novel post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.  Current projects focus on the roles of viral microRNAs and unusual translational mechanisms during HSV infection. 

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Stephen C. Harrison

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-5609
Fax: 
617-432-5600
Address: 
Room SGM - 130
Address: 
250 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston MA 02115

We are structural biologists concerned with the organization and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies. We ask the following kinds of questions. (1) How do viruses assemble and get into and out of cells? (2) What are the molecular mechanisms of vesicular membrane traffic, particularly in the clathrin-coated vesicle pathway? (3) What is the molecular architecture of a kinetochore and how does this architecture embody its required mechanical and signal-transducing properties?

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James M. Hogle

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432- 3918
Fax: 
617-432- 4360
Address: 
Room C-122
Address: 
250 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston MA 02115

Our laboratory uses structural approaches to explore how viruses enter cells and replicate. Current research in the laboratory is focused in two areas: 1) a multiscaled approach to characterizing the cell entry pathway of poliovirus and other simple nonenveloped viruses, 2) structural studies of key proteins in the replication of herpes viruses (in collaboration with Don Coen) and poliovirus and it close relatives.

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Charles C. Richardson

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-1864
Fax: 
617-432-3362
Address: 
Room C2-219
Address: 
240 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston MA 02115

Fig. 1A major goal is to define, in molecular terms, the mechanism by which a chromosome is replicated. The replication of the chromosome of bacteriophage T7 has been used as a model system.  T7 has evolved an efficient and economical system for DNA replication.  The cartoon depicts the T7 replisome and illustrates the major molecular motors and contacts. On the leading strand, T7 DNA polymerase (gp5) undergoes multiple conformational changes as it moves from one template position to another and senses the correct fit of an incoming deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate.  E.

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