Department of
Biological Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes

Alan D. D'Andrea

Professor
Telephone: 
617- 632-2112
Fax: 
617- 632-5757
Address: 
Room 640, Mayer Building, DFCI
Address: 
44 Binney Street
Address: 
Boston , MA 02115

Our laboratory examines the molecular signaling pathways which regulate the DNA damage response in mammalian cells. Disruption of these pathways, by germline or somatic mutation, leads to genomic instability, cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation, and defective cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. These pathways are often disrupted in cancer cells, accounting for the chromosome instability and increased mutation frequency in human tumors.

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David Fisher

Professor
Telephone: 
617-632-4916
Fax: 
617- 632-2085
Address: 
Room Dana-630, DFCI
Address: 
44 Binney St.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

Our group studies cell death/proliferation signals in relation to development and disease, particularly cancer. We attempt to understand critical modes of cell homeostasis with a goal of molecular targeted therapy for human disease.

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Ed Harlow

Professor

Research in the Harlow laboratory focuses on new approaches for functional analysis in mammalian cells. Our primary interest is learning how to do high throughput and unbiased screens for genes that affect key phenotypes of cancer biology. The levels of specific proteins can be increased or decreased by expressing the protein itself from a cDNA copy or by the introduction of an inhibitory RNA for the mRNA. We use libraries of individually cloned and sequenced full length coding regions and siRNAs to raise or lower protein levels in cells and study changes in cellular phenotypes. At present we have a complete proteome for several test organisms—bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and libraries for several viruses.

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Kevin Struhl

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432- 2104
Fax: 
617-432- 2529
Address: 
Room C1-315
Address: 
240 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

The molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Transcriptional regulation in response to environmental and developmental cues is mediated by the combinatorial and synergistic action of specific DNA-binding activators and repressors on components of the general transcription machinery and chromatin modifying activities. Much of the work in this laboratory combines genetic, molecular, and genomic approaches available in yeast to address fundamental questions about transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in living cells. In addition, we are defining physiological targets of human transcriptional regulatory proteins and chromatin modifications on a whole-genome basis using a novel microarray approach.

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