Department of
Biological Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

Intracellular signaling and cell:cell interactions

Jon Clardy

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-2845
Fax: 
617-738-3702
Address: 
Room C-643
Address: 
240 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The laboratory focuses on biologically active small molecules, especially those from bacteria and fungi with an overall goal of understanding how small molecules control biological processes.  Organizing themes include: 1) function-based discovery of microbially-produced small molecules and their roles in microbial symbioses , 2) function-based discovery of biologically active small molecules using high-throughput screening,  3) genome-based discovery of bacterially-produced small molecules.  The laboratory is also involved in infectious disease research and current projects include developing a high-throughput screen for small molecules that influence the liver stage of malaria.  

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George Daley

Professor
Telephone: 
617-919-2015
Fax: 
617-730-0222
Address: 
Children's Hospital
Address: 
300 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The laboratory focuses on stem cell biology, with an emphasis on hematopoietic differentiation from human and mouse pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem, ES, and induced Pluirpotent Stem, iPS) cells, epigenetic reprogramming, germ cell development, and the overlap between germ cells, stem cells and cancer. Our goals are described briefly below:

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Michael Eck

Professor
Telephone: 
617-632-5860
Fax: 
617-632-4393
Address: 
Longwood Center, 4313
Address: 
360 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

Our laboratory studies the structural biology of cell signaling and the actin cytoskeleton. Active areas of investigation include: 1) the structure and regulation of focal adhesion kinase, 2) the molecular mechanisms that drive recruitment and activation of Src-family kinases in T-cell activation, and 3) formin proteins and the mechanisms by which they carry out the regulated assembly of actin structures. Additionally, we are studying other signaling interactions that may be targets for development of anti-cancer drugs. These include b -catenin/Tcf-4 and the interaction of transcription factor activation domains with p300/CBP.

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Elaine Elion

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-3815
Fax: 
617-738-0516
Address: 
Room C1-302
Address: 
240 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston MA 02115

Our group studies eukaryotic signal transduction, focusing on how external stimuli control proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. Work has centered on defining how mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades function in vivo. MAPK cascades form the cores of numerous eukaryotic signal transduction pathways that control growth, differentiation and survival. Misregulation of MAPK cascades is associated with a variety of diseases, including cancer. We use a yeast model system (Figure 1) and genetic, biochemical and cell biological approaches.

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Andrew Lassar

Professor
Telephone: 
617- 432-3831
Fax: 
617-738-0516
Address: 
Room C1 -303
Address: 
240 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

Current work in my lab focuses on the signals and transcription factors that maintain skeletal muscle stem cells, the transcriptional regulatory pathways that regulates chondrocyte formation and maturation, and the development of a gene therapy model to treat osteoarthritis:
 

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Hao Wu

Professor
Telephone: 
617-713-8160
Fax: 
617-713-8161
Address: 
Center for Life Sciences Boston (CLSB), Rm. 3099
Address: 
Three Blackfan Circle
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The Wu laboratory of structural immunology focuses on elucidating the molecular mechanism of signal transduction by immune receptors, especially innate immune receptors. The lab began its studies on the signaling of a classical cytokine produced by the innate immune system, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which induces diverse cellular responses such as NF-κB activation and cell death. Receptors for TNF belong to the large TNF receptor (TNFR) superfamily. The second pursuit of the lab has been the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily, which induces signaling pathways overlapping with those of the TNFR superfamily.

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