Department of
Biological Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

Infectious disease

Jon Clardy

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-2845
Fax: 
617-738-3702
Address: 
Room C-643
Address: 
240 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The laboratory focuses on biologically active small molecules, especially those from bacteria and fungi with an overall goal of understanding how small molecules control biological processes.  Organizing themes include: 1) function-based discovery of microbially-produced small molecules and their roles in microbial symbioses , 2) function-based discovery of biologically active small molecules using high-throughput screening,  3) genome-based discovery of bacterially-produced small molecules.  The laboratory is also involved in infectious disease research and current projects include developing a high-throughput screen for small molecules that influence the liver stage of malaria.  

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David Golan

Professor
Telephone: 
617- 432- 2256
Fax: 
617-432- 3833
Address: 
Room SGM - 304C
Address: 
240 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston MA 02115

Our goals are to understand the molecular interactions controlling protein and lipid mobility and distribution in cell membranes, the roles these mechanisms play in interactions between cells, and the relationships between derangements in these mechanisms and the pathophysiology of disease. We have designed and constructed several time-resolved scanning laser microscopes for interactive monitoring, tracking, and manipulating of biological samples at the single-cell and single-molecule levels on the µs-ms time scale and nm distance scale. Using these instruments, we are investigating: 1) Molecular interactions in erythroid cell membranes.

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Hao Wu

Professor
Telephone: 
617-713-8160
Fax: 
617-713-8161
Address: 
Center for Life Sciences Boston (CLSB), Rm. 3099
Address: 
Three Blackfan Circle
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The Wu laboratory of structural immunology focuses on elucidating the molecular mechanism of signal transduction by immune receptors, especially innate immune receptors. The lab began its studies on the signaling of a classical cytokine produced by the innate immune system, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which induces diverse cellular responses such as NF-κB activation and cell death. Receptors for TNF belong to the large TNF receptor (TNFR) superfamily. The second pursuit of the lab has been the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily, which induces signaling pathways overlapping with those of the TNFR superfamily.

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