Department of
Biological Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

Human disease

George Daley

Professor
Telephone: 
617-919-2015
Fax: 
617-730-0222
Address: 
Children's Hospital
Address: 
300 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The laboratory focuses on stem cell biology, with an emphasis on hematopoietic differentiation from human and mouse pluripotent stem cells (embryonic stem, ES, and induced Pluirpotent Stem, iPS) cells, epigenetic reprogramming, germ cell development, and the overlap between germ cells, stem cells and cancer. Our goals are described briefly below:

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David Fisher

Professor
Telephone: 
617-632-4916
Fax: 
617- 632-2085
Address: 
Room Dana-630, DFCI
Address: 
44 Binney St.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

Our group studies cell death/proliferation signals in relation to development and disease, particularly cancer. We attempt to understand critical modes of cell homeostasis with a goal of molecular targeted therapy for human disease.

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David Golan

Professor
Telephone: 
617- 432- 2256
Fax: 
617-432- 3833
Address: 
Room SGM - 304C
Address: 
240 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston MA 02115

Our goals are to understand the molecular interactions controlling protein and lipid mobility and distribution in cell membranes, the roles these mechanisms play in interactions between cells, and the relationships between derangements in these mechanisms and the pathophysiology of disease. We have designed and constructed several time-resolved scanning laser microscopes for interactive monitoring, tracking, and manipulating of biological samples at the single-cell and single-molecule levels on the µs-ms time scale and nm distance scale. Using these instruments, we are investigating: 1) Molecular interactions in erythroid cell membranes.

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Shamil Sunyaev

Assistant Professor
Telephone: 
617-525-4735
Fax: 
617-525-4705
Address: 
New Research Building, Room 466b
Address: 
77 Avenue Louis Pasteur
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

We are a computational biology laboratory. We develop and apply computational methods to pursue various problems in fields of genetics, genomics and proteomics. Our main interest is to analyze the population genetic variation and the genome divergence between species with the major focus on the protein coding regions. The effect of amino acid substitutions on function and structure of proteins can be frequently understood and even predicted via comparative sequence analysis and analysis of the protein structure. We relate the above functional studies to the evolutionary process of natural selection in order to track the evolution of proteins at the molecular level.

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Gerhard Wagner

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432- 3213
Fax: 
617-432- 4383
Address: 
Room C1-112
Address: 
240 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

Our research is concerned with structures of proteins and protein complexes. We use NMR spectroscopy, computational tools and small molecule inhibitors to study function and cellular significance of protein interactions.

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Morris F. White

Professor
Telephone: 
617-732-2578
Fax: 
617-732-2593
Address: 
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Address: 
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology
Address: 
Children's Hospital, New Research Building, Room 4210
Address: 
300 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

We investigate the molecular basis of insulin signal transduction to understand the pathophysiology of diabetes and related disorders, including obesity, infertility, and cardiovascular and retinal disease. Much of our work on signaling pathways that mediate the insulin response was fueled by our discovery of the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) protein family. Since diabetes is a complicated, multisystem disease, we use mice to integrate our molecular studies with physiology. Transgenic mice lacking the genes for Irs1 or Irs2 reveal a surprisingly close relation between the molecular regulation of insulin secretion and that of insulin action. We now understand that the IRS2-branch of the insulin/IGF signaling pathways controls pancreatic β-cell growth, function and survival.

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