Department of
Biological Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

Chromatin and other DNA: protein interactions

Alan D. D'Andrea

Professor
Telephone: 
617- 632-2112
Fax: 
617- 632-5757
Address: 
Room 640, Mayer Building, DFCI
Address: 
44 Binney Street
Address: 
Boston , MA 02115

Our laboratory examines the molecular signaling pathways which regulate the DNA damage response in mammalian cells. Disruption of these pathways, by germline or somatic mutation, leads to genomic instability, cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation, and defective cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. These pathways are often disrupted in cancer cells, accounting for the chromosome instability and increased mutation frequency in human tumors.

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Joseph Loparo

Associate Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-5586
Fax: 
617-738-0516
Address: 
Room SGM-204A
Address: 
240 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

Single-Molecule Studies of DNA Damage Tolerance and Repair

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Charles C. Richardson

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-1864
Fax: 
617-432-3362
Address: 
Room C2-219
Address: 
240 Longwood Avenue
Address: 
Boston MA 02115

Fig. 1A major goal is to define, in molecular terms, the mechanism by which a chromosome is replicated. The replication of the chromosome of bacteriophage T7 has been used as a model system.  T7 has evolved an efficient and economical system for DNA replication.  The cartoon depicts the T7 replisome and illustrates the major molecular motors and contacts. On the leading strand, T7 DNA polymerase (gp5) undergoes multiple conformational changes as it moves from one template position to another and senses the correct fit of an incoming deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate.  E.

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Kevin Struhl

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432- 2104
Fax: 
617-432- 2529
Address: 
Room C1-315
Address: 
240 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

The molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Transcriptional regulation in response to environmental and developmental cues is mediated by the combinatorial and synergistic action of specific DNA-binding activators and repressors on components of the general transcription machinery and chromatin modifying activities. Much of the work in this laboratory combines genetic, molecular, and genomic approaches available in yeast to address fundamental questions about transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in living cells. In addition, we are defining physiological targets of human transcriptional regulatory proteins and chromatin modifications on a whole-genome basis using a novel microarray approach.

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Johannes Walter

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432-4799
Fax: 
617-738-0516
Address: 
Room C1-226A
Address: 
240 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The chromosome replication cycle
My lab uses a model cell-free system derived from Xenopus eggs to study how genetic information is faithfully transmitted from one cell generation to the next. We are interested in the following questions:

1. How is DNA replication coordinated with the cell cycle?

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Timur Yusufzai

Assistant Professor
Telephone: 
617-582-9214
Fax: 
617-582-8213
Address: 
Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Address: 
Jimmy Fund Building, Room 520
Address: 
450 Brookline Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

My lab uses a combination of biochemical and cell-based approaches to study factors involved in chromatin and DNA dynamics, with an emphasis on human disease models.  We are particularly interested in ATP-driven motor proteins such as chromatin remodeling enzymes, helicases, and the recently discovered annealing helicases.

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