Department of
Biological Chemistry & Molecular Pharmacology

Cell death / Apoptosis

David Fisher

Professor
Telephone: 
617-632-4916
Fax: 
617- 632-2085
Address: 
Room Dana-630, DFCI
Address: 
44 Binney St.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

Our group studies cell death/proliferation signals in relation to development and disease, particularly cancer. We attempt to understand critical modes of cell homeostasis with a goal of molecular targeted therapy for human disease.

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Ed Harlow

Professor

Research in the Harlow laboratory focuses on new approaches for functional analysis in mammalian cells. Our primary interest is learning how to do high throughput and unbiased screens for genes that affect key phenotypes of cancer biology. The levels of specific proteins can be increased or decreased by expressing the protein itself from a cDNA copy or by the introduction of an inhibitory RNA for the mRNA. We use libraries of individually cloned and sequenced full length coding regions and siRNAs to raise or lower protein levels in cells and study changes in cellular phenotypes. At present we have a complete proteome for several test organisms—bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and libraries for several viruses.

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Rosalind Segal

Professor
Telephone: 
617-632-4737
Fax: 
617-632-2085
Address: 
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Address: 
44 Binney Street
Address: 
Dana 620
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The research work in our laboratory has focused on growth factors that regulate survival and proliferation in the developing nervous system. These regulatory pathways are frequently disrupted in tumor formation or in neurodegeneration.

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Gerhard Wagner

Professor
Telephone: 
617-432- 3213
Fax: 
617-432- 4383
Address: 
Room C1-112
Address: 
240 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02215

Our research is concerned with structures of proteins and protein complexes. We use NMR spectroscopy, computational tools and small molecule inhibitors to study function and cellular significance of protein interactions.

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Morris F. White

Professor
Telephone: 
617-732-2578
Fax: 
617-732-2593
Address: 
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Address: 
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology
Address: 
Children's Hospital, New Research Building, Room 4210
Address: 
300 Longwood Ave.
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

We investigate the molecular basis of insulin signal transduction to understand the pathophysiology of diabetes and related disorders, including obesity, infertility, and cardiovascular and retinal disease. Much of our work on signaling pathways that mediate the insulin response was fueled by our discovery of the insulin receptor substrate (IRS) protein family. Since diabetes is a complicated, multisystem disease, we use mice to integrate our molecular studies with physiology. Transgenic mice lacking the genes for Irs1 or Irs2 reveal a surprisingly close relation between the molecular regulation of insulin secretion and that of insulin action. We now understand that the IRS2-branch of the insulin/IGF signaling pathways controls pancreatic β-cell growth, function and survival.

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Hao Wu

Professor
Telephone: 
617-713-8160
Fax: 
617-713-8161
Address: 
Center for Life Sciences Boston (CLSB), Rm. 3099
Address: 
Three Blackfan Circle
Address: 
Boston, MA 02115

The Wu laboratory of structural immunology focuses on elucidating the molecular mechanism of signal transduction by immune receptors, especially innate immune receptors. The lab began its studies on the signaling of a classical cytokine produced by the innate immune system, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which induces diverse cellular responses such as NF-κB activation and cell death. Receptors for TNF belong to the large TNF receptor (TNFR) superfamily. The second pursuit of the lab has been the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily, which induces signaling pathways overlapping with those of the TNFR superfamily.

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